DCR collects public comments on MacDonald Park improvements

The Department of Conservation and Recreation presented their ideas for long awaited improvements for the MacDonald park that borders the Mystic River in Medford.  This is the largest green space along the Mystic River that spans from the intersection of Routes 28 and Routes 16 beyond the Meadow Glen Mall.  You can see the green space wrapping around the river west of the Malden River.

Mystic River Urban Trail Map

 

The Mystic River Watershed Association collected public comments through a survey and presented them to the DCR in letter form.  The Friends of the Malden River also commented upon their vision for the park via a letter to the DCR.

Both letters are linked below.  Please feel free to comment via our facebook page: Friends of the Malden River.  Thank you for participating.  We will keep the public informed of this important piece of the Mystic River Greenways!

MacDonald Park Upgrade – FoMR Comments – 5-26-16 –

 

MyRWA Comments to DCR – Macdonald Park – 5-2016

 

DCR presentation for MacDonald park improvements

Rain Garden Rejuvenation – April 23rd at West and Wellington

Let’s bring new life to the established rain garden at the Everett tail end of the Northern Strand Trail.  This rain garden diverts storm water runoff from our Mystic River.  We will learn the importance of rain gardens from Clay Larson who first helped to establish this garden through a grant provided by Mystic River Watershed Association.  Clay spoke at our last meeting about rain gardens.  Now we can get dirty!

The Friends of the Malden River will be maintaining this garden as part of our community efforts to protect our watershed through public education and involvement.  We will glean as a group the actual and the potential benefits of rain gardens.

We are accepting donations of native and hardy plants to enrich this garden.  You may bring your plant to share!  Tools will be provided.  Wear long sleeves and long pants and other protective clothing (gloves, hats, boots) for more adventurous cleanup, if you like!

Looking forward to seeing you there.  Please contact us at friendsofthemaldenriver@gmail.com for any questions or concerns.  You can visit our facebook page for updates:  Friends of the Malden River

Swimming in the Malden River? Mayor DeMaria,MyRWA Hope it can Happen

To see the full article in the Everett Independent newspaper: click on this link

Swimming in the Malden River? Mayor DeMaria,MyRWA Hope it can Happen

We are looking forward to reading your comments either on this page or on the Everett Independent page.
March 11, 2016

By

A photo of the Malden River from the Malden side of the water way, looking towards Everett. While parkland and development has sprung up on the Malden side, Everett’s riverfront is largely blocked off by industrial uses, but Mayor DeMaria would like to re-open access to the river for residents.

By Seth Daniel

If one were to ask directions to the Malden River from almost any person on the streets of Everett, they would likely not know any more than the person asking.

The Malden River has been forgotten for generations, though it runs right through the western neighborhoods of Everett. That’s mostly because the river has been “stay away” territory for decades. Though the picturesque waterway winds through the City, like most of Everett’s waterfront, young people and adults were told to not go near the river as it was significantly polluted.

For decades, the old General Electric plant blocked access to a good deal of the riverfront, and other heavy industry also got in the way of the residents accessing the water. And even if there was access, the water wasn’t the kind of water anyone really wanted to have access to.

That’s all about to change if Mayor Carlo DeMaria has anything to say about it – not to mention advocates from the Mystic River Watershed Association (MyRWA) and the Friends of the Malden River.

All now have a vision for the forgotten waterway that includes transportation, recreation and exercise.

“I haven’t been that involved, but I want to get more involved with the communities and people all along the Mystic River,” said Mayor DeMaria. “There may be a way where we can clean up that river and connect all these areas [by water]. I’d like to see that river way cleaned up. It’s a big goal of mine now. Right now, there are kids from Everett rowing crew on the Malden River. Imagine that? My parents always told me never to go anywhere near that river, and now kids from Everett are rowing on it…It would be incredible to get people on that water rowing or crewing or getting exercise. I’m hoping in my lifetime we’re able to swim in the Malden River – to be able to be on the GE parkland and to swim there. I’d love to see that.”

But that could very well happen.

Beth McBlane of the MyRWA said her organization and members have a similar vision that includes access to the water, as well as connectivity to bicycle trails and parklands.

“The Mystic River Watershed Association is very pleased to see Mayor Carlo DeMaria’s focus on increasing connectivity of bike paths and open space throughout the City as well as on Everett’s waterways – the Mystic and Malden Rivers,” said McBlane. “Bringing people to the river through connected pathways and offering an opportunity to access the river via canoe and kayak will only strengthen efforts to clean up these natural resources.”

Councilor Michael McLaughlin, who represents the Malden River area, said he fully supports the idea. He said he has seen the progress Malden has made on its side of the River – including developing properties and parks on the banks of the river.

“As the City Councilor from the area that has water access, I totally agree with Mayor DeMaria’s vision and plans for the Malden River,” said McLaughlin. “I support the clean up and opening of the Malden River fully. I have seen firsthand what is happening on the Malden side of the river. I know the local school’s as well as many other organizations and local residents enjoy the use of the waterways, so why not in Everett? I have lived in Everett all of my life and have never had the opportunity of using our waterfront. After talking with area residents and hearing of days past when we had access of the Malden River, I am absolutely on board.”

One obstacle standing in the way of a clean Malden River is actually the infrastructure in Everett and surrounding communities. Many of the sewer systems can overflow during heavy rain events because they aren’t all separated from the stormwater systems. When those combined sewer outflows – known as CSOs – overflow, they dump stormwater and sewage into the river.

Working with the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other governing bodies, DeMaria said they are making progress to end that pollutant.

“We’re really trying to make sure those illicit discharges don’t happen,” said DeMaria.

McBlane said the CSO situation does pose a significant pollution threat to the river, and eliminating it would be a major step towards getting the Malden River usable once more.

“Mayor DeMaria is correct – stormwater poses a threat to the health of the Malden River, which received a “C-“ water quality grade for bacteria in the 2014 EPA-issued Mystic River Water Quality Report Card,” said McBlane. “We commend the City for their stormwater awareness program. We look forward to working with the City of Everett around improved stormwater management and the inclusion of Green Infrastructure.”

For DeMaria, he said the idea of cleaning up the waterways is outside of the usual City discussions, but after looking at a map, one begins to realize how tied to the water Everett could be.

He said the City has already secured a boat launch for non-motorized vessels at the Mellon Bank site, which is where the crew team is based. There are also plan for another canoe launch and pier at the GE parkland site.

“You look at Somerville and they have the Winter Hill Yacht Club down there and Medford has its yacht club and moorings,” he said. “We’re surrounded by water in Everett, but we have no access to it. GE had it wrapped up over there for years, but I see what Wynn is planning to do for the Monsanto site, and I want to be able to do the same thing all the way up the waterfront to the Everett/Malden line. It’s a major goal of mine now.”

Swimming in the Malden River? Mayor DeMaria,MyRWA Hope it can Happen

Note:  the link to this article in the Everett Independent Newspaper:
We are looking forward to reading your comments either on this page or on the Everett Independent page.
March 11, 2016

By

A photo of the Malden River from the Malden side of the water way, looking towards Everett. While parkland and development has sprung up on the Malden side, Everett’s riverfront is largely blocked off by industrial uses, but Mayor DeMaria would like to re-open access to the river for residents.

By Seth Daniel

If one were to ask directions to the Malden River from almost any person on the streets of Everett, they would likely not know any more than the person asking.

The Malden River has been forgotten for generations, though it runs right through the western neighborhoods of Everett. That’s mostly because the river has been “stay away” territory for decades. Though the picturesque waterway winds through the City, like most of Everett’s waterfront, young people and adults were told to not go near the river as it was significantly polluted.

For decades, the old General Electric plant blocked access to a good deal of the riverfront, and other heavy industry also got in the way of the residents accessing the water. And even if there was access, the water wasn’t the kind of water anyone really wanted to have access to.

That’s all about to change if Mayor Carlo DeMaria has anything to say about it – not to mention advocates from the Mystic River Watershed Association (MyRWA) and the Friends of the Malden River.

All now have a vision for the forgotten waterway that includes transportation, recreation and exercise.

“I haven’t been that involved, but I want to get more involved with the communities and people all along the Mystic River,” said Mayor DeMaria. “There may be a way where we can clean up that river and connect all these areas [by water]. I’d like to see that river way cleaned up. It’s a big goal of mine now. Right now, there are kids from Everett rowing crew on the Malden River. Imagine that? My parents always told me never to go anywhere near that river, and now kids from Everett are rowing on it…It would be incredible to get people on that water rowing or crewing or getting exercise. I’m hoping in my lifetime we’re able to swim in the Malden River – to be able to be on the GE parkland and to swim there. I’d love to see that.”

But that could very well happen.

Beth McBlane of the MyRWA said her organization and members have a similar vision that includes access to the water, as well as connectivity to bicycle trails and parklands.

“The Mystic River Watershed Association is very pleased to see Mayor Carlo DeMaria’s focus on increasing connectivity of bike paths and open space throughout the City as well as on Everett’s waterways – the Mystic and Malden Rivers,” said McBlane. “Bringing people to the river through connected pathways and offering an opportunity to access the river via canoe and kayak will only strengthen efforts to clean up these natural resources.”

Councilor Michael McLaughlin, who represents the Malden River area, said he fully supports the idea. He said he has seen the progress Malden has made on its side of the River – including developing properties and parks on the banks of the river.

“As the City Councilor from the area that has water access, I totally agree with Mayor DeMaria’s vision and plans for the Malden River,” said McLaughlin. “I support the clean up and opening of the Malden River fully. I have seen firsthand what is happening on the Malden side of the river. I know the local school’s as well as many other organizations and local residents enjoy the use of the waterways, so why not in Everett? I have lived in Everett all of my life and have never had the opportunity of using our waterfront. After talking with area residents and hearing of days past when we had access of the Malden River, I am absolutely on board.”

One obstacle standing in the way of a clean Malden River is actually the infrastructure in Everett and surrounding communities. Many of the sewer systems can overflow during heavy rain events because they aren’t all separated from the stormwater systems. When those combined sewer outflows – known as CSOs – overflow, they dump stormwater and sewage into the river.

Working with the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other governing bodies, DeMaria said they are making progress to end that pollutant.

“We’re really trying to make sure those illicit discharges don’t happen,” said DeMaria.

McBlane said the CSO situation does pose a significant pollution threat to the river, and eliminating it would be a major step towards getting the Malden River usable once more.

“Mayor DeMaria is correct – stormwater poses a threat to the health of the Malden River, which received a “C-“ water quality grade for bacteria in the 2014 EPA-issued Mystic River Water Quality Report Card,” said McBlane. “We commend the City for their stormwater awareness program. We look forward to working with the City of Everett around improved stormwater management and the inclusion of Green Infrastructure.”

For DeMaria, he said the idea of cleaning up the waterways is outside of the usual City discussions, but after looking at a map, one begins to realize how tied to the water Everett could be.

He said the City has already secured a boat launch for non-motorized vessels at the Mellon Bank site, which is where the crew team is based. There are also plan for another canoe launch and pier at the GE parkland site.

“You look at Somerville and they have the Winter Hill Yacht Club down there and Medford has its yacht club and moorings,” he said. “We’re surrounded by water in Everett, but we have no access to it. GE had it wrapped up over there for years, but I see what Wynn is planning to do for the Monsanto site, and I want to be able to do the same thing all the way up the waterfront to the Everett/Malden line. It’s a major goal of mine now.”

 

Malden’s 2.3 mile secret

Malden’s 2.3 mile secret

The Malden River is receiving the attention it deserves! Thank you to the Friends of Malden River!

Neighborhood View

Five hundred years ago, the streets we drive everyday in Malden were vast swampland dotted with rocky outcroppings and covered with dense forest. A wide, winding river cut through this hilly forestland and Indian tribes like the Massachusett could live safely under the cover of the forest and watch for enemies approaching up the river. Tidal salt water flowed into the river from the ocean and with it came abundant fish, shellfish and sea fowl, and the large furry animals which preyed on them, providing plenty of food and clothing for the Native Americans.

1796 Map of Malden River prepared by Peter Tufts. Courtesy of “Images of America, Malden” Malden Historical Society 1796 map of Malden River prepared by Peter Tufts. Courtesy of “Images of America, Malden” Malden Historical Society

In the 1600s a few brave Pilgrim settlers from Boston found their way up the river and realized its value. The river provided a quick means of travel, alewife, blueback herring, oysters and clams could be found in…

View original post 868 more words

Conversations of the Converse Site

By Hue Holley

Courtesy Photo

During and after grammar school, I grew up on Avon Street next to Converse ball field.  Avon Street is pictured to the left of the ball field.  From our backyard there was a slope of a foot and a half to reach the lower level of the ball field.  Many a pickup baseball game was played there with Albert and Nick DellArchiprete, my brother Jim, and others.

On the right side of the picture is a square section where water would be sprayed into the air into a pool and presumably circulated back to the factory.  There was an outflow from that pool onto a section of the field where a black gel like substance collected and was confined by dirt berms. During dry weather you could walk across this substance, but if had rained and the surface was still damp, walking across it would invariably find you sinking up to your waist in thick, congealed gunk.  Shoes and clothing would have to be discarded by not happy mothers, including mine.

Many Converse workers ate lunch on the edges off the ball field, and discard their soft drink bottles before going back to work.  My friends and I collected these bottles in a cart and would take them a local variety store for the two send deposit. It worked out well for a while until the store owner would only refund the deposits in merchandise.

In the spring time, the bottom left of the field would flood and become a breeding pool for Eastern Toads. Another neighborhood friend, Hank Volpe, the nephew of the Governor, delighted in startling my mother by having a frog or two peeping/ leaping out of his shirt pocket.

At the bottom right is a billboard, and to the right of that was an extensive marsh area with a meandering creek made its way to the Malden River (Little Creek).  There were minnow traps placed there by a few locals.  Walking in the marshy area was always an adventure.

MALDEN HISTORY: Remember when?

Courtesy Photo

 

By Peter Levine

Posted Jan. 25, 2016 at 2:10 PM

MALDEN

Each week, we intend to bring you a rare and vintage glimpse into Malden’s glorious past. Rarely seen photograph’s and images that we hope you will enjoy, and share with friends.

This week’s photo — before Mammoth Mart! Before Star Market! Before the Stadium Cafe! Before even Donut Villa, there was nothing. Here is the layout: top of the photo is the Malden River — in those days the only known place on earth with more chemicals and contaminates than Dow Chemical. Converse Rubber Factory on Pearl Street is located in front of the river where, I swear, more sneakers went out the back windows than the back loading docks. In front of Converse was where Edgeworth gathered on the 4th of July and many other special celebratory occasions. It may have been called Converse Field, I will ask a few Edgeworth old timers like Hank Pitts, Joe Teta, or Phil Longo if they remember. It was also home to a baseball diamond that many in Edgeworth remember fondly to this very day. The ball field is the current home to John Brewer’s Tavern, Donut Villa and the Dollar Store, amongst others.

https://shar.es/1hw4WJ via @maldenobserver

Please share your stories!  There is a comment attached to this article at the Malden Observer  by Bill Nutile.  Now, Bill lives in Chestertown, MD (right on the Chesapeake Bay).

From Bill Nutile: “…my friends and I would walk over the railroad tracks from Edgeworth, (Pearl Street and Malden Street area) to go swimming in the Malden River…”

Stay tuned for more stories to be shared on the river!

 

Click here to read the comments and share your stories